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Employers

The law's unfair labor practice provisions place certain restrictions on employers and labor organizations in their relations with employees and each other. For example, employers may not interfere with employees in the exercise of their rights or resort to discrimination to discourage them from unionizing. Employers are also protected, however, from union unfair labor practices, such as secondary boycotts. Employers should also consult the information addressed to employees and unions.\n\nThe statements contained in this smart phone application are intended for users' general information. This application may not be cited as legal authority. Particular statements may be subject to unstated exceptions, qualifications, and/or limitations, and may even be rendered unreliable without prior notice by changes in the law. In addition, although we have sought to provide broad general guidance, we do not claim completeness. In other words, you may be subject to prohibitions under the National Labor Relations Act that are not set forth here. The National Labor Relations Board expressly disclaims any purpose or intent to furnish legal advice. You may contact your nearest regional Board office and/or an attorney to discuss your specific situation or to learn more about your rights and obligations under the NLRA.

Protecting your legal rights
Interfering with employee rights (Section 7 & 8(a)(1))
Interfering with or dominating a union (Section 8(a)(2))
Discriminating against employees because of their union activities or sympathies (Section 8(a)(3))
Discriminating against employees for NLRB activity (Section 8(a)(4))
Bargaining in good faith with employees’ union representative (Section 8(d) & 8(a)(5))
Election-related content
“Hot Cargo” agreements (Section 8(e))

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